Mii's Humblr Blog
Mii's Humblr Blog
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dynamicafrica:

The beauty of the ‘Gele’ photographed by #Nigerian photographer J.D. Okhai Ojeikere
The Yoruba are one of the largest ethno-linguistic or ethnic groups in West Africa. The majority of the Yoruba speak the Yoruba language and are found in Nigeria, constituting approximately 21 percent of its total population, and around 30 million individuals throughout West Africa. 
The traditional Yoruba women’s outfit consists of four parts: the buba (a blouse like shirt), the iro (wrap skirt), the gele (head tie/wrap), and the ipele or iborun (shawl or shoulder sash). Aso oke is a hand loomed cloth woven by the Yoruba people and it is traditionally used to make the ensemble, although in more recent times organza, taffeta, damask and laces have been used. Stiff fabrics are preferred, at least for the gele, so that it holds it shape throughout the day.
The gele is wrapped around the head but unlike most head wraps that lie flat on contour of the head, the gele is manipulated to stand away from the head, creating an enormous headpiece.
Over time and with more wealth becoming available to the commoners (versus the royalty), the size and quality of workmanship and fabrication in the gele became to be a potent symbol of a woman’s socio-economic status.
(text source)
dynamicafrica:

The beauty of the ‘Gele’ photographed by #Nigerian photographer J.D. Okhai Ojeikere
The Yoruba are one of the largest ethno-linguistic or ethnic groups in West Africa. The majority of the Yoruba speak the Yoruba language and are found in Nigeria, constituting approximately 21 percent of its total population, and around 30 million individuals throughout West Africa. 
The traditional Yoruba women’s outfit consists of four parts: the buba (a blouse like shirt), the iro (wrap skirt), the gele (head tie/wrap), and the ipele or iborun (shawl or shoulder sash). Aso oke is a hand loomed cloth woven by the Yoruba people and it is traditionally used to make the ensemble, although in more recent times organza, taffeta, damask and laces have been used. Stiff fabrics are preferred, at least for the gele, so that it holds it shape throughout the day.
The gele is wrapped around the head but unlike most head wraps that lie flat on contour of the head, the gele is manipulated to stand away from the head, creating an enormous headpiece.
Over time and with more wealth becoming available to the commoners (versus the royalty), the size and quality of workmanship and fabrication in the gele became to be a potent symbol of a woman’s socio-economic status.
(text source)
dynamicafrica:

The beauty of the ‘Gele’ photographed by #Nigerian photographer J.D. Okhai Ojeikere
The Yoruba are one of the largest ethno-linguistic or ethnic groups in West Africa. The majority of the Yoruba speak the Yoruba language and are found in Nigeria, constituting approximately 21 percent of its total population, and around 30 million individuals throughout West Africa. 
The traditional Yoruba women’s outfit consists of four parts: the buba (a blouse like shirt), the iro (wrap skirt), the gele (head tie/wrap), and the ipele or iborun (shawl or shoulder sash). Aso oke is a hand loomed cloth woven by the Yoruba people and it is traditionally used to make the ensemble, although in more recent times organza, taffeta, damask and laces have been used. Stiff fabrics are preferred, at least for the gele, so that it holds it shape throughout the day.
The gele is wrapped around the head but unlike most head wraps that lie flat on contour of the head, the gele is manipulated to stand away from the head, creating an enormous headpiece.
Over time and with more wealth becoming available to the commoners (versus the royalty), the size and quality of workmanship and fabrication in the gele became to be a potent symbol of a woman’s socio-economic status.
(text source)
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bobbycaputo:

Hollywood Streets, 1979-1983
In the late 1970s, Matt Sweeney dropped out of high school with dreams of becoming a movie maker. While working in gas stations and restaurants in San Jose, California, he found out about Francis Ford Coppola’s Zoetrope education/training/intern program, and moved to Hollywood to pursue that. Matt wanted to work behind the camera, so he started practicing with a Nikon F2 camera, shooting Kodachrome slides. Inspired by photographers like Garry Winogrand, Minor White, and Elliott Erwitt, he set out to document the world around him on the streets of Hollywood, photographing scenes from 1979 through 1983, while hoping somehow to hit the big time. The internship never happened, and unfortunately, no production jobs materialized. At 21, Matt moved on, selling his equipment and working through college to do lab work. “I went to Hollywood to ‘make it’, but didn’t, and ended up taking pictures of Hollywood, capturing scenes of others ‘not making it’ as well. It didn’t escape me then and it doesn’t now.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Hollywood Streets, 1979-1983
In the late 1970s, Matt Sweeney dropped out of high school with dreams of becoming a movie maker. While working in gas stations and restaurants in San Jose, California, he found out about Francis Ford Coppola’s Zoetrope education/training/intern program, and moved to Hollywood to pursue that. Matt wanted to work behind the camera, so he started practicing with a Nikon F2 camera, shooting Kodachrome slides. Inspired by photographers like Garry Winogrand, Minor White, and Elliott Erwitt, he set out to document the world around him on the streets of Hollywood, photographing scenes from 1979 through 1983, while hoping somehow to hit the big time. The internship never happened, and unfortunately, no production jobs materialized. At 21, Matt moved on, selling his equipment and working through college to do lab work. “I went to Hollywood to ‘make it’, but didn’t, and ended up taking pictures of Hollywood, capturing scenes of others ‘not making it’ as well. It didn’t escape me then and it doesn’t now.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Hollywood Streets, 1979-1983
In the late 1970s, Matt Sweeney dropped out of high school with dreams of becoming a movie maker. While working in gas stations and restaurants in San Jose, California, he found out about Francis Ford Coppola’s Zoetrope education/training/intern program, and moved to Hollywood to pursue that. Matt wanted to work behind the camera, so he started practicing with a Nikon F2 camera, shooting Kodachrome slides. Inspired by photographers like Garry Winogrand, Minor White, and Elliott Erwitt, he set out to document the world around him on the streets of Hollywood, photographing scenes from 1979 through 1983, while hoping somehow to hit the big time. The internship never happened, and unfortunately, no production jobs materialized. At 21, Matt moved on, selling his equipment and working through college to do lab work. “I went to Hollywood to ‘make it’, but didn’t, and ended up taking pictures of Hollywood, capturing scenes of others ‘not making it’ as well. It didn’t escape me then and it doesn’t now.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Hollywood Streets, 1979-1983
In the late 1970s, Matt Sweeney dropped out of high school with dreams of becoming a movie maker. While working in gas stations and restaurants in San Jose, California, he found out about Francis Ford Coppola’s Zoetrope education/training/intern program, and moved to Hollywood to pursue that. Matt wanted to work behind the camera, so he started practicing with a Nikon F2 camera, shooting Kodachrome slides. Inspired by photographers like Garry Winogrand, Minor White, and Elliott Erwitt, he set out to document the world around him on the streets of Hollywood, photographing scenes from 1979 through 1983, while hoping somehow to hit the big time. The internship never happened, and unfortunately, no production jobs materialized. At 21, Matt moved on, selling his equipment and working through college to do lab work. “I went to Hollywood to ‘make it’, but didn’t, and ended up taking pictures of Hollywood, capturing scenes of others ‘not making it’ as well. It didn’t escape me then and it doesn’t now.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Hollywood Streets, 1979-1983
In the late 1970s, Matt Sweeney dropped out of high school with dreams of becoming a movie maker. While working in gas stations and restaurants in San Jose, California, he found out about Francis Ford Coppola’s Zoetrope education/training/intern program, and moved to Hollywood to pursue that. Matt wanted to work behind the camera, so he started practicing with a Nikon F2 camera, shooting Kodachrome slides. Inspired by photographers like Garry Winogrand, Minor White, and Elliott Erwitt, he set out to document the world around him on the streets of Hollywood, photographing scenes from 1979 through 1983, while hoping somehow to hit the big time. The internship never happened, and unfortunately, no production jobs materialized. At 21, Matt moved on, selling his equipment and working through college to do lab work. “I went to Hollywood to ‘make it’, but didn’t, and ended up taking pictures of Hollywood, capturing scenes of others ‘not making it’ as well. It didn’t escape me then and it doesn’t now.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Hollywood Streets, 1979-1983
In the late 1970s, Matt Sweeney dropped out of high school with dreams of becoming a movie maker. While working in gas stations and restaurants in San Jose, California, he found out about Francis Ford Coppola’s Zoetrope education/training/intern program, and moved to Hollywood to pursue that. Matt wanted to work behind the camera, so he started practicing with a Nikon F2 camera, shooting Kodachrome slides. Inspired by photographers like Garry Winogrand, Minor White, and Elliott Erwitt, he set out to document the world around him on the streets of Hollywood, photographing scenes from 1979 through 1983, while hoping somehow to hit the big time. The internship never happened, and unfortunately, no production jobs materialized. At 21, Matt moved on, selling his equipment and working through college to do lab work. “I went to Hollywood to ‘make it’, but didn’t, and ended up taking pictures of Hollywood, capturing scenes of others ‘not making it’ as well. It didn’t escape me then and it doesn’t now.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Hollywood Streets, 1979-1983
In the late 1970s, Matt Sweeney dropped out of high school with dreams of becoming a movie maker. While working in gas stations and restaurants in San Jose, California, he found out about Francis Ford Coppola’s Zoetrope education/training/intern program, and moved to Hollywood to pursue that. Matt wanted to work behind the camera, so he started practicing with a Nikon F2 camera, shooting Kodachrome slides. Inspired by photographers like Garry Winogrand, Minor White, and Elliott Erwitt, he set out to document the world around him on the streets of Hollywood, photographing scenes from 1979 through 1983, while hoping somehow to hit the big time. The internship never happened, and unfortunately, no production jobs materialized. At 21, Matt moved on, selling his equipment and working through college to do lab work. “I went to Hollywood to ‘make it’, but didn’t, and ended up taking pictures of Hollywood, capturing scenes of others ‘not making it’ as well. It didn’t escape me then and it doesn’t now.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Hollywood Streets, 1979-1983
In the late 1970s, Matt Sweeney dropped out of high school with dreams of becoming a movie maker. While working in gas stations and restaurants in San Jose, California, he found out about Francis Ford Coppola’s Zoetrope education/training/intern program, and moved to Hollywood to pursue that. Matt wanted to work behind the camera, so he started practicing with a Nikon F2 camera, shooting Kodachrome slides. Inspired by photographers like Garry Winogrand, Minor White, and Elliott Erwitt, he set out to document the world around him on the streets of Hollywood, photographing scenes from 1979 through 1983, while hoping somehow to hit the big time. The internship never happened, and unfortunately, no production jobs materialized. At 21, Matt moved on, selling his equipment and working through college to do lab work. “I went to Hollywood to ‘make it’, but didn’t, and ended up taking pictures of Hollywood, capturing scenes of others ‘not making it’ as well. It didn’t escape me then and it doesn’t now.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Hollywood Streets, 1979-1983
In the late 1970s, Matt Sweeney dropped out of high school with dreams of becoming a movie maker. While working in gas stations and restaurants in San Jose, California, he found out about Francis Ford Coppola’s Zoetrope education/training/intern program, and moved to Hollywood to pursue that. Matt wanted to work behind the camera, so he started practicing with a Nikon F2 camera, shooting Kodachrome slides. Inspired by photographers like Garry Winogrand, Minor White, and Elliott Erwitt, he set out to document the world around him on the streets of Hollywood, photographing scenes from 1979 through 1983, while hoping somehow to hit the big time. The internship never happened, and unfortunately, no production jobs materialized. At 21, Matt moved on, selling his equipment and working through college to do lab work. “I went to Hollywood to ‘make it’, but didn’t, and ended up taking pictures of Hollywood, capturing scenes of others ‘not making it’ as well. It didn’t escape me then and it doesn’t now.
(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Hollywood Streets, 1979-1983
In the late 1970s, Matt Sweeney dropped out of high school with dreams of becoming a movie maker. While working in gas stations and restaurants in San Jose, California, he found out about Francis Ford Coppola’s Zoetrope education/training/intern program, and moved to Hollywood to pursue that. Matt wanted to work behind the camera, so he started practicing with a Nikon F2 camera, shooting Kodachrome slides. Inspired by photographers like Garry Winogrand, Minor White, and Elliott Erwitt, he set out to document the world around him on the streets of Hollywood, photographing scenes from 1979 through 1983, while hoping somehow to hit the big time. The internship never happened, and unfortunately, no production jobs materialized. At 21, Matt moved on, selling his equipment and working through college to do lab work. “I went to Hollywood to ‘make it’, but didn’t, and ended up taking pictures of Hollywood, capturing scenes of others ‘not making it’ as well. It didn’t escape me then and it doesn’t now.
(Continue Reading)
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Carefree Black Boys & Girls 

Carefree Black Boys & Girls 

Carefree Black Boys & Girls 

Carefree Black Boys & Girls 

Carefree Black Boys & Girls 
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dynamicafrica:

Vintage cover photos of magazines that catered specifically to black women. 

huh….DOPE!!
dynamicafrica:

Vintage cover photos of magazines that catered specifically to black women. 

huh….DOPE!!
dynamicafrica:

Vintage cover photos of magazines that catered specifically to black women. 

huh….DOPE!!
dynamicafrica:

Vintage cover photos of magazines that catered specifically to black women. 

huh….DOPE!!
dynamicafrica:

Vintage cover photos of magazines that catered specifically to black women. 

huh….DOPE!!
dynamicafrica:

Vintage cover photos of magazines that catered specifically to black women. 

huh….DOPE!!
dynamicafrica:

Vintage cover photos of magazines that catered specifically to black women. 

huh….DOPE!!
dynamicafrica:

Vintage cover photos of magazines that catered specifically to black women. 

huh….DOPE!!
dynamicafrica:

Vintage cover photos of magazines that catered specifically to black women. 

huh….DOPE!!
dynamicafrica:

Vintage cover photos of magazines that catered specifically to black women. 

huh….DOPE!!
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guardian:

Jim Goldberg, the photographer who caught the heartbreak on both sides of America’s social divide. See more here
All photos by Jim Goldberg
guardian:

Jim Goldberg, the photographer who caught the heartbreak on both sides of America’s social divide. See more here
All photos by Jim Goldberg
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electripipedream:

My soul…
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vintagechampagnefever:

Image by Guy Bourdin
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jemeos:

Guy bourdin
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